header-left
Share to Facebook Share to Twitter Bookmark and Share
File #: 180088    Version: 0 Name:
Type: Resolution Status: ADOPTED
File created: 2/1/2018 In control: CITY COUNCIL
On agenda: Final action:
Title: Recognizing a Moment of Silence on February 1, 2018 in honor of the 50th Anniversary of the sacrifices made by Memphis sanitation workers who proclaimed "I Am a Man" in their successful campaign to secure their economic rights and social dignity.
Sponsors: Councilmember Green, Councilmember Parker, Councilmember Squilla, Councilmember Taubenberger, Councilmember Gym, Councilmember Domb
Attachments: 1. Signature18008800.pdf
Title
Recognizing a Moment of Silence on February 1, 2018 in honor of the 50th Anniversary of the sacrifices made by Memphis sanitation workers who proclaimed "I Am a Man" in their successful campaign to secure their economic rights and social dignity.

Body
WHEREAS, 2018 marks the 50th Anniversary of both the Sanitation Workers Strike in Memphis, Tennessee - when they were compelled to remind the public that they were indeed human - and the assassination of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., while there supporting the Sanitation Workers Strike; and

WHEREAS, According to the 2007 book by Michael Honey, A Plantation in the City, regarding this period: "The mix of segregation, low wages, anti-union sentiment, and machine politics in Memphis created a particularly deadly legacy for public sector employees"; and

WHEREAS, On February 1, 1968, two Memphis garbage collectors, Echol Cole and Robert Walker, were crushed to death by a malfunctioning truck - a deadly result of the lack of proper maintenance Memphis workers had been organizing to rectify; and

WHEREAS, On February 11th, over 700 workers attended a union meeting and unanimously voted to strike; and

WHEREAS, The following day, 1,300 black workers from the Memphis Department of Public Works went on strike, demanding recognition of their union, better safety standards, and a decent wage; and

WHEREAS, On February 24th, 150 local ministers formed Community on the Move for Equality ("COME"), under the leadership of minister James Lawson, which was committed to the use of nonviolent civil disobedience to fill Memphis's jails and bring attention to the plight of the sanitation workers; and

WHEREAS, By the beginning of March, local high school and college students, nearly a quarter of them white, were participating alongside garbage workers in daily marches; and over one hundred people, including several ministers, had been arrested; and

WHEREAS, In continuation of his ongoing efforts striving ...

Click here for full text