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File #: 180669    Version: 0 Name:
Type: Resolution Status: IN COUNCIL - FINAL PASSAGE
File created: 6/14/2018 In control: CITY COUNCIL
On agenda: Final action:
Title: Honoring and recognizing Dr. Sadie Tanner Mossell Alexander, Esq., and calling for the creation and erection of a statue to commemorate her accomplishments and contributions to Philadelphia and beyond.
Sponsors: Councilmember Parker, Councilmember Reynolds Brown, Councilmember Blackwell, Councilmember Green, Councilmember Taubenberger
Attachments: 1. Resolution No. 18066900.pdf
Title
Honoring and recognizing Dr. Sadie Tanner Mossell Alexander, Esq., and calling for the creation and erection of a statue to commemorate her accomplishments and contributions to Philadelphia and beyond.

Body
WHEREAS, Sadie Tanner Mossell, a woman of many firsts, is the epitome of a trailblazer. She was born on January 2, 1898 in Philadelphia to Mary Louisa Tanner and Aaron Albert Mossell II, who himself was the first African American graduate from the University of Pennsylvania Law School in 1888; and

WHEREAS, Mossell followed in her father's footsteps and graduated early with honors from the University of Pennsylvania with a bachelor's degree in education; and

WHEREAS, During her time at the University of Pennsylvania, she faced countless incidents of discrimination and alienation at the hands of her classmates - including white women - as well as the University leadership and staff. The dean of the Law School even refused to speak with her, and other female students were prohibited from studying with her; and

WHEREAS, Despite these hurdles as a student, Mossell persevered, continued to pursue her academic goals, and enrolled in the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, where in 1921, she became the first black person to receive a Ph.D. in economics, and one of three black women in the country to first earn a doctorate degree. Her thesis, "The Standard of Living among One Hundred Negro Migrant Families in Philadelphia," explored the household budgets of black migrants; and

WHEREAS, During the course of her studies, from 1919 to 1923, Mossell also served as the first National President of the illustrious Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Incorporated, where she worked to expand the organization's membership and advance their five-point program thrust of economic development, educational development, physical and mental awareness, international involvement, and political and social involvement. Mossell's commitment to the expansion of ...

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