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File #: 190969    Version: 0 Name:
Type: Resolution Status: ADOPTED
File created: 12/5/2019 In control: CITY COUNCIL
On agenda: Final action: 12/5/2019
Title: Recognizing and honoring Renee Chenault Fattah on the release of her new film, "In Our Right Mind: Alzheimer's and Other Dementias' Impact in Communities of Color".
Sponsors: Councilmember Blackwell, Councilmember Green, Councilmember Jones, Councilmember Domb, Councilmember Quiñones Sánchez, Councilmember Johnson, Councilmember Greenlee, Councilmember Gym, Councilmember Henon, Councilmember Oh, Councilmember Bass, Councilmember Reynolds Brown, Councilmember Parker, Councilmember Taubenberger, Councilmember Squilla
Attachments: 1. Signature19096900
Title
Recognizing and honoring Renee Chenault Fattah on the release of her new film, "In Our Right Mind: Alzheimer's and Other Dementias' Impact in Communities of Color".
Body
WHEREAS, Renee Chenault-Fattah is a former co-anchor of the WCAU NBC 10 News at 4 p.m. and 6 p.m. on weeknights in Philadelphia. She majored in political science at Johns Hopkins University, and went on to earn her J.D. at the University of Pennsylvania Law School; and
WHEREAS, Ms. Chenault-Fattah worked at Hughes Hubbard & Reed, a law firm in New York, and then clerked for Judge Damon Keith of the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals. She then began her media career, earning a master's degree in journalism from the University of Missouri in Columbia, Missouri; and
WHEREAS, Ms. Chenault-Fattah joined WCAU, in September 1991, and served as an anchor and a reporter. After a few years anchoring the noon broadcast with Tim Lake, Chenault-Fattah was promoted to the 6 p.m. and 11 p.m. news in March 1995. In 2003, Chenault served as co-anchor at 4 p.m., 6 p.m., and 11 p.m. on WCAU NBC 10 News; and
WHEREAS, Recently, Ms. Chenault-Fattah premiered her film, "In Our Right Mind: Alzheimer's and Other Dementias' Impact in Communities of Color" in the Perelman Theatre on the Kimmel Center Cultural Campus after two years of hard work and preparation; and
WHEREAS, The 52-minute film gives an inside look into families of color living with the day to day realities and Alzheimer's Disease and other forms of Dementia and why these diseases tend to impact communities of color more than others. According to the Alzheimer's Association black people are two times more likely than white people to develop Alzheimer's Disease and Hispanics are 1.5 times more likely to develop the disease than white people; and
WHEREAS, Chenault-Fattah hopes this important film will be widely viewed. She is working with NBC 10 to have it aired on television and has another screening planned in Baltimore. In 2020, she plans to travel...

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