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File #: 210197    Version: 0 Name:
Type: Resolution Status: ADOPTED
File created: 3/4/2021 In control: CITY COUNCIL
On agenda: Final action: 3/4/2021
Title: In honor of Women's History Month we take this opportunity to renew and Recognize March 10th as Harriet Tubman Day in the City of Philadelphia.
Sponsors: Councilmember Squilla, Councilmember Green, Councilmember Parker, Councilmember Gilmore Richardson, Councilmember Domb
Attachments: 1. Signature21019700
Title
In honor of Women's History Month we take this opportunity to renew and Recognize March 10th as Harriet Tubman Day in the City of Philadelphia.

Body
WHEREAS, Harriett Tubman's exact date of birth is unknown, it is estimated that she was born Araminta Ross to Harriet Green and Benjamin Ross sometime between 1820 and 1822 in Dorchester County, Maryland; and

WHEREAS, Harriet Tubman is also known as the "Moses of her people," was born into slavery. As a young girl, she survived a traumatic brain injury and experienced visions that guided her, she escaped and helped others gain their freedom as a "conductor" of the Underground Railroad; and

WHEREAS, During her lifetime, Tubman also served as a spy, a scout, a guerrilla soldier, and a nurse for the Union Army during the Civil War. She is also considered to be the first African American woman to serve in the military; and

WHEREAS, It was resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress, that March 10, 1990 be designated as "Harriet Tubman Day", to be observed by the people of the United States with appropriate ceremonies and activities; and

WHEREAS, In celebrating Harriet Tubman's life, we remember her commitment to freedom and her extraordinary courage; and

WHEREAS, When Harriet Tubman escaped her own slavery by reaching Philadelphia, she said "I was a stranger in a strange land. My father, my mother, my brothers and sisters and friends were in Maryland. But I was free and they should be free"; and

WHEREAS, It is believed that over the span of 11 years, Tubman rescued over 70 slaves in about 13 expeditions including her brothers, Henry, Ben, and Robert, their wives and some of their children. It is also believed that Tubman provided specific instructions to 50 to 60 additional fugitives who were then able to escape to the north; and

WHEREAS, Harriet Tubman was sheltered at Philadelphia's Johnson House in Germantown, a hub of the Underground Railroad, and w...

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