header-left
Share to Facebook Share to Twitter Bookmark and Share
File #: 210252    Version: 0 Name:
Type: Resolution Status: IN COUNCIL - FINAL PASSAGE
File created: 3/25/2021 In control: CITY COUNCIL
On agenda: Final action:
Title: Honoring the life and legacy of Emma C. Chappell, and recognizing her leadership and advocacy in efforts to impact social justice, to improve racial and gender equity, and to foster real change.
Sponsors: Councilmember Parker, Councilmember Quiñones Sánchez, Councilmember Bass, Councilmember Brooks, Councilmember Gilmore Richardson, Councilmember Gym, Council President Clarke, Councilmember Squilla, Councilmember Johnson, Councilmember Henon, Councilmember Green, Councilmember Oh, Councilmember Domb, Councilmember Thomas
Attachments: 1. Signature21025200
Title
Honoring the life and legacy of Emma C. Chappell, and recognizing her leadership and advocacy in efforts to impact social justice, to improve racial and gender equity, and to foster real change.

Body
WHEREAS, Emma C. Chappell was the founder of United Bank of Philadelphia, established in 1992. She became the first Black woman to establish a commercial bank in the United States; and

WHEREAS, Chappell was able to raise seed money for the bank after several years of what Black Enterprise magazine calls "financial missionary work." A group of prominent Black Philadelphians approached her about the bank idea in 1987 and contributed $600,000. In 1992, after a five-year effort, Chappell raised $6 million, $1 million more than was required by Pennsylvania regulators in order to capitalize a bank, and she founded the United Bank of Philadelphia. The bank grew rapidly within the first few years and gained the attention of the local business community. The bank was given the Blue Chip Enterprises Award, sponsored by Mass Mutual and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. Chappell also used the bank as a way to promote activities that would improve the quality of life of Philadelphia's minority communities; and

WHEREAS, Chappell got her first start at a bank in 1959 when she became a clerk-photographer at Continental Bank; She got the job at the bank with the help of her pastor, Reverend Leon Sullivan of Zion Baptist Church. Rev. Sullivan was a civil rights activist and also made in effort to help guide the youth in his congregation. After she graduated high school, Rev. Sullivan gave her an aptitude test and, according to Chappell, he noted her high math skills and said "I have just the job for you"; and

WHEREAS, Chappell knew she wanted to be an executive at the bank, so she took evening classes at Temple University for five years. She graduated in 1967 with a Bachelor's degree. Soon after, Chappell began the executive training program at her Continental bank; she finis...

Click here for full text