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File #: 230680    Version: 0 Name:
Type: Resolution Status: ADOPTED
File created: 10/5/2023 In control: CITY COUNCIL
On agenda: Final action: 10/5/2023
Title: Honoring war-hero Waverly Bernard Woodson, Jr., for his courageous and selfless service during World War II and further calling on Overbrook High School to induct him into their Hall of Fame.
Sponsors: Councilmember Jones, Councilmember Bass, Councilmember Squilla, Councilmember Driscoll, Councilmember Vaughn, Councilmember Gauthier, Councilmember Gilmore Richardson, Councilmember Harrity, Councilmember Phillips, Councilmember Brooks
Attachments: 1. Signature23068000
Title
Honoring war-hero Waverly Bernard Woodson, Jr., for his courageous and selfless service during World War II and further calling on Overbrook High School to induct him into their Hall of Fame.

Body
WHEREAS, Waverly Woodson was born in Philadelphia in 1922. After attending Overbrook High School, Mr. Woodson attended Lincoln University where he began his education in pre-medical training; and

WHEREAS, After the United States entered World War II, Waverly put his studies on hold and joined the United States Army alongside his brother Eugene. Waverly joined the Anti-Aircraft Artillery Officer Candidate School where he was one of two African Americans. Before completing the course, he was notified that because of his race, he would not be eligible to be billeted in the United States Army Coast Artillery Corps. This led him to train as a combat medic, assigned to the 320th Barrage Balloon Battalion, and he underwent training at Camp Tyson in Paris, Tennessee. By 1944, he held the rank of corporal; and

WHEREAS, On June 6, 1944, Operation Overlord, or the Battle of Normandy, took place in France. Waverly's battalion participated in this infamous battle, being the only African American battalion to participate. Waverly was assigned to a landing craft tank (LCT) that was the land at Normandy in the early morning; and

WHEREAS, On the way to battle, his LCT was hit by a naval mine, causing it to lose power and drift with the tides. During the loss of power, Waverly was hit by an "eighty-eight" shell, causing shrapnel wounds to his lower body. After reaching the shore, his wounds were treated, and he and his battalion began setting up a field dressing station to aid those who were injured during the battle. Waverly worked tirelessly from 10 a.m. till 4 p.m. the following day. During those 30 hours, he treated soldiers in need of bullet removal, amputation, plasma, and limb setting. After his work at the field station was finished, Waverly was alerted of three Brit...

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