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File #: 210239    Version: 0 Name:
Type: Resolution Status: ADOPTED
File created: 3/18/2021 In control: CITY COUNCIL
On agenda: Final action: 3/25/2021
Title: Recognizing March 2021 as Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month to understand the symptoms of colorectal cancer and the importance of regular screenings; and increase access to screenings in underserved communities.
Sponsors: Councilmember Bass, Councilmember Henon, Councilmember Squilla, Councilmember Gym, Councilmember Parker, Councilmember Gilmore Richardson, Councilmember Gauthier, Councilmember Domb, Councilmember Brooks, Councilmember Green, Councilmember Thomas
Attachments: 1. Resolution No. 21023900, 2. Signature21023900
Title
Recognizing March 2021 as Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month to understand the symptoms of colorectal cancer and the importance of regular screenings; and increase access to screenings in underserved communities.

Body
WHEREAS, Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States and the third leading cause of cancer deaths in young adults. About 140,000 people in the country are diagnosed with colorectal cancer each year and more than 50,000 die from the disease each year; and

WHEREAS, Only about two-thirds of adults in the United States are up to date with colorectal cancer screening. About 51% of adults ages 50 to 54 are not up to date with their screening. There is a 90% chance recovery if colorectal cancer is recognized during the early stages of the disease, but only 40% of colon cancers are identified in the early stages due to the lack of a screening; and

WHEREAS, The American Cancer Society recommends that regular screening for colorectal cancer begins at the age of 45 so the disease can be recognized during the early stages. While the majority of cases occur in people over 50 years old, all ages should be aware of the signs of the disease as 1 in 5 people ages 20 to 54 years old are diagnosed with colon cancer, and the risk of disease increases with age; and

WHEREAS, Minority groups are more likely to be impacted by colorectal cancer diagnoses because of a lack of access to screening resources in the early stages of the disease; and

WHEREAS, The Colon Cancer Coalition has partnered with the Fox Chase Cancer Center and the Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia to help fund research projects on treatment options for colorectal cancer patients, as well as research on health disparities in Philadelphia and opportunities to increase screening in underserved communities; and

WHEREAS, The Colon Cancer Coalition is committed to increasing screening rates of people over the age of 50 to 80%, which would s...

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